Friday, July 30, 2010

Posted by on Jul 29, 2010 in WOD | 6 comments

Start with Deadlift work 3×5

WOD:

21-15-9

  • Squat cleans (115/75)
  • Hand Stand Push Ups

Post comments

CrossFit Vancouver says it all.

Article in the Telegraphjournal.com

N.S. farmers only get 13% of local food dollar: study

Published Thursday July 29th, 2010

HALIFAX – Nova Scotia farmers are only getting about 13 cents of every grocery dollar spent in the province, a decline of about four per cent over the past decade, a new report suggests.

Click to Enlarge
TOM UHLMAN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
 
Most Canadian consumers do not pay much attention to where food comes from when shopping, suggests a 2005 Ipsos Reid survey compiled for AgriFood Canada.

The three-year study, released Tuesday by the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture and the Ecology Action Centre, says the bulk of the food consumed in the province is imported, on average from about 4,000 kilometres away.

“It has become increasingly clear that the food system in Nova Scotia is in crisis,” wrote co-authors Jen Scott and Marla MacLeod.

The authors argue that food prices must become “more real” with production costs that include a fair return to farmers.

“We really need to start thinking about where our food comes from and taking action on it,” said MacLeod, a member of the committee’s food action committee.

However, MacLeod said that despite the heartbreaking stories of farm closures, there is a growing passion for local food.

“In the study we found that local food is not necessarily more expensive than imported food when you look at the sticker price,” said MacLeod. “But we need to start thinking of our local food system as an investment.”

A 2005 Ipsos Reid survey compiled for AgriFood Canada suggested that most Canadian consumers do not pay much attention to where food comes from when shopping.

While they do associate farms with food quality, they tend to focus more on other factors when deciding where to buy groceries.

The survey suggested that an overwhelming majority of Canadians felt that food produced in Canada is of better quality than food produced in other countries.

That sentiment was similar in every region across the country.

For Beth Densmore, a vice-president with the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture, the divide between sentiment and practice is frustrating.

“The economic spinoff of supporting local farmers is huge,” she said.

Densmore said they are trying to work with producers and local retailers to increase the profile and availability of locally grown goods.

“Consumers need to be aware of what we have, what’s out there and how far it travels.”

The study suggests that “there’s nothing inherently wrong” with importing food but there are costs associated with most of it when greenhouse gases and energy consumption are considered.

“The study examined 66 products and found that on average, the food products were travelling nearly 4,000 kilometres from farm to plate,” said MacLeod.

“There is potential for reducing transport-related greenhouse gas emissions by switching to locally grown foods.”

The federation of agriculture launched a new marketing campaign to coincide with the report’s release. The campaign is aimed at introducing consumers to the people who produce their food.

The website, www.meetyourfarmer.ca, is meant to “create and improve the relationship” between farmers and the consumer, said the federation.

“They’re hoping to change (the website) over the coming months, so that (people) understand that farming is not just having sheep, it’s not just having lettuce,” said Densmore.

“It could be all different aspects of it and hopefully put a face to these products.”

So far, the website has seven farmer profiles from the Annapolis Valley and Hants County, as well as videos and stories.

—-

The Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture has launched a new website aimed at raising the profile of local farmers.
The start of the marketing campaign comes a day after the release of a report that shows Nova Scotia farmers are getting 13 cents of every grocery dollar spent in the province.
The federation wants to boost that figure, partly with the help of the website www.meetyourfarmer.ca.
The federation says the website is aimed at “improving the relationship” between farmers and consumers.
Federation vice-president Beth Densmore says most people have no clue where their food comes from.
So far, the website has seven farmer profiles from the Annapolis Valley and Hants County, as well as videos and stories about the farms.
THE CANADIAN PRESS

6 Comments

  1. If these are the stats from Nova Scotia, then New Brunswick is likely lagging even further behind this.

    For people looking to support local here the Kingston Farmer’s Market open 8am to 1pm ,May 1st to November 20th this year, is an excellent option.
    http://www.kingstonfarmersmarket.ca/index.html

    Something else that you all should consider for next year is buying a share in the local CSA.

    Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, is an arrangement that provides a direct connection between consumers and a local farmer. Participating supporters contribute to the farm’s yearly operating budget by purchasing in advance a share of the season’s harvest. By making this commitment ahead of time, CSA participants join the farmer in assuming the costs, risks, and rewards of growing that season’s crops. Participants help pay for seeds, supplies, labour, water, equipment maintenance and other costs. In return, the farmer provides a weekly delivery of fresh, nutritious vegetables throughout the harvest season.

    It works out to about $25/week for what they call enough produce for 2 adults that eat an average amount of vegetables, and there is also the option of having it delivered to your door for $5 extra per week.
    http://www.chestnutacreslimited.com/401.html

    If you’re looking for information on organic farms in the maritimes, the following link should help.
    http://www.acornorganic.org/farmers/indexNB.html

    Also, turns out I won’t be into the gym today as I’ll be cursing at a little ball while chasing it around a golf course.

  2. I wish I was there for this one.

  3. Thanks for the article posting! I try to eat as local as possible and support local veg and meat farmers. It’s just a habit you have to try to get in to. All it takes is just a peek at where it’s from on the store label. The tough thing is that we’ve gotten so used to eating whatever we want when we want it. Sometimes it’s just not available local. Definitely worth the effort though.

    More food talk!!

  4. Thanks for the article posting! I try to eat as local as possible and support local veg and meat farmers. It’s just a habit you have to try to get in to. All it takes is just a peek at where it’s from on the store label. The tough thing is that we’ve gotten so used to eating whatever we want when we want it. Sometimes it’s just not available local. Definitely worth the effort though.

    More food talk!!

  5. organic farms could actually save us from carcinogens and toxins`~:

  6. organic farms could actually save us from carcinogens and toxins`~: